Hudson

HUDSON

State News MS&U Writer

If you're a Spartan, gimme a "Hell yeah!"

MSU is being invaded Sept. 29 by the World Wrestling Federation's "Raw is War" wrestling extravaganza. The event will be taped, and the following Monday it will be broadcast on the USA Network to an audience of more than 6 million households.

As a prelude to the show, WWF wrestler Al Snow visited East Lansing with his trademark friends "Head."

Snow was a wretched sight, taking instructions on his behavior from a mannequin's head and babbling with delusions of past and future grandeur.

According to Snow, WWF President Vince McMahon has continually avoided Snow and the phone calls Snow has made concerning his need to prove himself in front of a national audience.

"What will literally happen is I will call him every day for three weeks," Snow said. "And he won't return my calls."

In 1995, Snow signed a contract with WWF. After signing, he became disenfranchised from the league because his characters, Avatar and Leif Cassidy, weren't giving him a chance to shine professionally.

"They weren't really given a chance," he said. "They didn't know what to do with me, and that's when I started to take matters in my own hands."

Snow has led a long and semi-illustrious career as a wrestler, with countless "gimmicks" or characters and 13 and a half years of experience. This includes a recent stint with the Extreme Championship Wrestling league, which markets itself with pay-per-view specials featuring spilled blood and gratuitous violence. WWF had loaned Snow out to the ECW, but Snow returned a changed man.

"While I was in ECW, I found the head and they starting talking to me," Snow said.

The "voices" speaking to Snow have told him to take control of the situation and have a meeting with McMahon.

World Wrestling Federation wrestler Al Snow talks about finding his mannequin head

"They talk to me all the time. Right now they're upset because they aren't standing up right," Snow explained while adjusting the head, which had fallen over on the couch it was placed on.

Snow described McMahon as a manipulator, complaining of his past manipulation at the hands of the WWF front office.

"People have gone in to meetings with Vince, and they agree to things that they don't even realize until they are in their car on the freeway home," he said.

What Snow may fail to realize is the current manipulation of his talents as the "crazy" wrestler. He admitted, however, that McMahon may be "playing" him, but said it didn't matter either way.

"After this meeting, we'll see who's playing who," Snow mumbled, showing himself in not so many words to be a defeated man, clinging to a career that won't support him.

And Snow left the interview in a stretched limo, it appeared he is just another pawn in McMahon's mind games.

A befuddled and confused man, Snow continually mentioned his ability to succeed at any facet of wrestling, including the high-flying "lucha libre" style of Mexican wrestling leagues an unlikely style for a man of 240 pounds.

"I have achieved regional and international success," bragged Snow with a straight face. But compared with WWF stars Dude Love, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and The Undertaker, Snow has proven next to nothing to the wrestling public.

But can he get his meeting with Vince McMahon? And will this make any difference to his career if he does? And most importantly, might Snow actually have all his marbles, pretend to be what McMahon wants and therefore hold the master plan to become a star in one of the premier leagues of professional wrestling?